Mid Foot Bridge

JennyRichmond01

Mentorship Member
Joined
Oct 29, 2020
Messages
2
Hello,
I am just going back through the content & picking up more bits I didn't get the first time around.
In this part I heard Dave discuss about the heel being off the floor - am i right in thinking that we lift the heel off the floor and get the patient to push down through their midfoot/toes if they cannot activate their midfoot with the heel down?. Then progression is getting them to place all the foot on the floor? In the past where patients have been unable to find their midfoot and activate it for this test/exercise I have placed a block under the arch ever so slightly to provide feedforward for the patient to find their midfoot & slowly take it away as they progress.
 

Shane

Head Therapist
Staff member
Staff Member
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Sep 9, 2020
Messages
88
Hey @JennyRichmond01, the reason we want to get the weight off the heel is to shorten the soleus and gastroc so that they will be in a shortened position (and hence at a disadvantage to to do work) so the hamstring should work more. If the calf cramps then we can reason that the loads not happy to go up into the hamstring (and we need to do more work on the hamstrings). If the hamstring cramps then at least load is going up there but it's not tolerating that load very well (so we work on the hamstrings). Obviously this is a very crude test and that's not always going to be the case but keeping it really simple that's how we interpret it.

What you are doing though is absolutely fine way to do it! There's no right or wrong and it's the exact same concept so long as you can clinically reason WHY you are doing it.
 

JoGilshan

Mastery Member
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Joined
Oct 22, 2020
Messages
12
Hey @JennyRichmond01, the reason we want to get the weight off the heel is to shorten the soleus and gastroc so that they will be in a shortened position (and hence at a disadvantage to to do work) so the hamstring should work more. If the calf cramps then we can reason that the loads not happy to go up into the hamstring (and we need to do more work on the hamstrings). If the hamstring cramps then at least load is going up there but it's not tolerating that load very well (so we work on the hamstrings). Obviously this is a very crude test and that's not always going to be the case but keeping it really simple that's how we interpret it.

What you are doing though is absolutely fine way to do it! There's no right or wrong and it's the exact same concept so long as you can clinically reason WHY you are doing it.
Out of interest Shane if the calf cramps why wouldn’t we think that the calf isn’t tolerating load rather than the hamstrings not ‘accepting it’?
 
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